Author Topic: New Porta Ledge Fly Design  (Read 8184 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« on: December 13, 2006, 06:09:05 pm »
Picture this, since I'm not going to do anything with this...

similar set up to an existing porta ledge, but instead of a long rain fly pole that there are shorter, pre bent fly poles stitched and fastened between the tensioners (and unfastenable too). This obviates the need to thread a big pole as the pre-bent poles are much shorter (only extending between each tensioner) and already fastened. Nothing to drop.

Moreover, now at this point you can't use the long pole as a cheat stick either. HAH!

You heard it here first.

A free ledge and fly for me if you use this design/manufacture it.




Offline euroford

  • A2 Flyer
  • ***
  • Posts: 66
    • View Profile
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2006, 09:58:58 am »
good idea!

but what i really want to see is a double skin ledge fly. i  picture something like the simple fly, prerigged for quick deployment made out of a super light highly breathable fabric.  you then deploy a super beafy seperatly package rainfly (envision the ankor yos fly) and pull the lightweight rainfly down inside it, attaching it to the outer fly with toggles along the pole path.

would provide a modular approach, can use the lite fly for little drips, and then a super beafy fly for when it gets bad, finally making a great leap forward in the fight against condensation.


Online deuce4

  • The Deuce
  • Administrator
  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 182
    • View Profile
    • http://www.bigwalls.net
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2006, 08:29:07 pm »
Hi Munge-

Not sure what you mean--any chance for a sketch?

One of the purposes of the pole is to extend the fly out beyond the straps for more room.  Does your design use the straps to hold the poles?

I have some ideas for portaledge improvements; to me, it seems not much has changed since the 1997 A5 developments,  though minor useful tweaks have been made to be sure (but some retrogressions too).

 Might make some more ledges one of these days, with my new shop space!

cheers
-------
Thanks for visiting the Big Walls Forum!!
John Middendorf

Offline euroford

  • A2 Flyer
  • ***
  • Posts: 66
    • View Profile
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2006, 03:06:50 pm »
i think i kind of get what munge was talking about. 

it sounds kind of like the basic pole design would not be much diffrent, but rather than a seperate pole connected between segments with a stretchy string (technical term) each pole segment would be individually sewn into the fly with their ends exposed.  then you connect them from the inside.  this sounds like it has a couple of advantages, you can't drop the pole, you can't loose the pole, and it also sounds just a little bit easier.  my first thought was that this would make packing a pain, but in reality it might make it easier as you can wrap the fly up around the poles just like a tent.

i think its a pretty clever idea.

duece, i think your right, there has not been much fly inovation, and i think their is room for tons.  we used the anker/a5 yosemiti fly this year, and though i think its probobly the nicest fly currently available, it does have shortcommings that could be solved.


Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2006, 09:53:23 pm »


One of the purposes of the pole is to extend the fly out beyond the straps for more room.  Does your design use the straps to hold the poles?



yes! exactly. bowing the poles to maximize that fly space and keep condensation out away from where it will touch your bag/bivy.

i made a sketch, but it's pretty rudimentary.

don't get me wrong, I dig my fish ledge, and I've also slept in a double A5 from the old days (Flagstaff) but there has got to be a better fly.

Offline lunchbox

  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 221
    • View Profile
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #5 on: January 04, 2007, 10:24:12 am »
I had an old Walrus tent with pre treaded poles.  Picked it up for $20 bucks at the local outdoor shop when they cleaned out their stock room.  It took me a week to come up with a suitable plan to remove the poles so the tent wasn't such a pain in the ass to set up. 

I don't want to sound like a nah-sayer, but i think anything pre rigged into the fly sounds like a bad idea. 

With that old Walrus tent you had to bunch all the tent material down on one end to separate the pole sections.  Then you had to fold the tent and roll it up around the poles. 

I'm all for fly inovation, but i think it needs to be stuffable. 

Changing the point where the ends of the poles attach to the ledge might be a good start.  Attaching them directly to the fly could push the ends of the fly away from your head and create more room on the ends of the ledge.  However, moving the ends of the poles from the frame of the ledge, up and onto the fly itself might make it considerably weaker in strong winds, rain and snow. 

How about an automatic windshield wiper system to clean the condensation off the walls while you sleep.

Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2007, 09:00:38 pm »
yeah, that could be problematic, but I was envisioning a retaining clip of some sort to keep the poles in line with the suspension strap when stored.

anyone use single wall material on a porta ledge fly with success?

Online deuce4

  • The Deuce
  • Administrator
  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 182
    • View Profile
    • http://www.bigwalls.net
Re: New Porta Ledge Fly Design
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2007, 12:18:30 pm »
We (at the old A5) designed many breathable flys.  The best material I found is one I developed while working for the big corporatation, called Tetratek.  It was a three ply, with a Trico lining.  Trico is a fine mesh material.  Bibler uses a inner layer that looks like paper fibers, which I do not think is as good for a tent material as the Trico.  The Trico seems to dissapate condensation better.

Breathable flys are best in cold dry situations, like in Baffin.  For Yosemite, my opinion is that the claycote 1.5 ounce waterproof coating is most effective for the severe wet storms that Yosemite has.
-------
Thanks for visiting the Big Walls Forum!!
John Middendorf