Author Topic: Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?  (Read 1664 times)

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Offline tolman_paul

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Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?
« on: September 06, 2011, 05:48:56 pm »
I'd planned on sewing webbing loops on my assorment of Leeper logans, bat hooks and cam hooks as well as Chouinard sky hooks, but try as I might, my singer clone only frustrates with it's inability to feed the thickness of webbing, balls up thread and breaks needles.  I figured it would be more elegant than tied webbing, but oh was I wrong.

Then it hit me, why use webbing at all when a 3/32" aircraft cable loop swaged together would be just as elegant and plenty strong.  Which lead to me searching through the garage, swager, check, 1/16" aircraft cable and swages, check, 1/8" cable (but the super stiff 1/19 which sucks for making loops out of).  Alas, I know I used to have a coil of 3/32" cable and swages but all I could locate was a small length and 3 swages.  I swaged up the leeper logan and bat hooks, guess I need to order some more cable and swages.

Asside from the fact most people don't have a swaging tool, am I missing something why swaged loops haven't been used much on aid gear other than rurps and A5 bird beaks?

Offline Garbonzo

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Re: Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2011, 06:08:28 pm »
I thought the same way, and swaged a bunch of my hooks years back.  I chopped them all off shortly after.  It is harder to rack/derack them, and the little bits of wire manage to snag every little hole on my wall hands.  Colored slings also greatly help in digging out the right hook from the snarl.  Cam hooks are especially bad about abrading their cables against the wall and then poking pin holes in already tender digits.

I eventually ended up with a bar tacker (though not really for this reason) and like the results better than swages and better than tied loops.  Only my talon and Fish hook have tied slingage.

To each his own.

skully

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Re: Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2011, 07:39:21 pm »
With tieoffs on hooks, they are easy to rack up, easy to replace. To each his own indeed, but sewn slings on hooks seems a bit of overkill, unless you're set up for it. Cheers!

Offline *Mucci*

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Re: Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2011, 10:41:55 pm »
I agree that abrasion is the biggest concern. One or two hook moves where your scoping left and right in the ladders and the cable is toast.

On large throw hooks, it doesn't matter much, Got a bridwell skyhook that is swaged!

I do all kinds of swage work, if anybody needs some new cables for the beaks and such let me know.


Offline Mike.

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Re: Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2011, 11:25:41 am »
Wow, thanks, Mucci. Very generous of you.


Agree with replies here. Cable on the big hooks, and optionally at that. Cable's handy for longevity, but IMO webbing has a better feel when it contacts the rock. Less like it's gonna skate when traversing. 5/8" supertape is hard to beat for standard bomberness. Cheap, available, cutable, knot-able, inspect-able, easily replaceable. That 5/8" white tie-off webbing Fish was (is?) hawking is great for lighter duty.

I don't have any home sewn jobbies. Some hooks I think are designed to have a knot in the webbing; Cliffhangers, Grapplings, Leepers, Talons.
Say no to limbers, excavators and retro-bolters. No matter how much he smiles.

Offline mhudon

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Re: Why webbing over swaged cable loops on hooks, etc?
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2011, 12:00:39 pm »
I'm actually replacing the wires on my beaks as they get damaged with 9/16 webbing. The little tag on the wire shows only 1.5 kN which is only around 300 pounds.

As far as hooks go, I don't really see a need for wires on them, 9/16 webbing is fine for me.

One little tip I have about beaks and Tomahawks is to tie a 1/2 inch webbing loop to the top hole and rack them from that, they never get tangled in anything else that way. Also, Beaks and Tomahawks are sort of hard to remove so once you get them a bit loose you can clip into the top loop and funkness them out.