Author Topic: Aiding in the cold  (Read 1509 times)

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Offline Durin

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Aiding in the cold
« on: November 27, 2011, 07:02:46 pm »
I was hoping to try aiding D7 on the Diamond in a few weeks, as soon as we hit calendar winter. Been on el cap a couple times in winter but that's so very different from a Colorado fourteener.

Can anyone recommend a dextrous glove for this?

Also, my partner and I will probably both be using Nepal Evo's. Can anyone recommend an aider for putting clunky boots into?

Weight and bulk will be of utmost importance since we'll be trying to get out of there as fast as possible. If anyone has any other tips for speed aiding in the cold, or this specific outing, let me know!

Thanks!

Offline Baltoro

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2011, 10:21:16 pm »
Durin
They may not be any better in the long run but you might check out Russian aiders for cold weather aiding as you're boot gets strapped in at the bottom and essentially stays in the step until you summit. They would require a little more fiddling with your hands at times to get the hooks in the rings but seem like they'd be ideal for big boot aiding.

Another deal I've had good luck with is wearing hand warmers next to your wrists where all the blood flows through to and from your hands. You'll need something to hold them in place and sometimes your gloves or a wrist warmer works, just make sure you're not cutting off any circulation.

Good luck.

-Ryan
Sometimes I succeed. Sometimes I fail. Sometimes I am too lazy to do either.
M. Twight

Offline Chad

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2011, 03:04:16 pm »
Normally, I use Metolius 4 & 5 step aiders, but when it's cold out, I think the Yates Speed Ladders are the ticket. Since you will have stiff boots on, the thinner steps (than the big wall ladders) are a total non-issue and the spreader bar might actually help to keep your feet warmer, by minimizing pinching from the side. The ladder style really come into their own when you are wearing bigger boots. For gloves, I am really liking the Cloudveil Ice Floe or Black Diamond Punisher gloves. It looks like Outdoor Research has some cool stuff out now, too.

Also, I apologize if there are any annoying hotlinks. I am on a loaner laptop while mine is being repaired and using Google Chrome browser for the first time. It seems like it automatically made a commercial link to "ladders"! but not necessarily the kind you want.
« Last Edit: November 28, 2011, 03:07:46 pm by Chad »

Offline Durin

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 12:05:36 pm »
Chad, that's super helpful.

And yeah, we might go for hand warmers on the wrists. My experience with them is to tape them outside your baselayer, but inside your shell, right before the hand.

Now I just gotta figure out how to fly up an icy/snowy north chimney!

Offline Mike.

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 05:21:30 pm »
I keep hearing people prop mechanic's gloves for cold-weather aiding. I'm not sure which they use, but the qualities sound ideal.

Say no to limbers, excavators and retro-bolters. No matter how much he smiles.

Offline smack

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 05:47:09 pm »
my gumby and unqualified speed climbing advice/strategy:

    Go for the climb a day after someone else has done the route. Minimal trail breaking, fewer snow mushrooms in the north chimney,
and any ice in key placements will be removed. 
Cheating? maybe.

So when are you going to be up there?

Offline Durin

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #6 on: December 01, 2011, 05:09:40 pm »
I'm fairly certain that few people ever even try the diamond in winter. Maybe a couple attempts each year, and fewer successes. And I have no idea when other parties would be up there. I figure we may as well trudge through the madness ourselves.

We're hopefully going for it somewhere between Dec 22 - Jan 4.

Offline Acobbs

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Re: Aiding in the cold
« Reply #7 on: December 02, 2011, 10:35:33 pm »
Durin,
I've recently been researching winter climbing on the Diamond.  D7 is the go to route. 
As to you're questions, a dextrous glove to me is one without alot of bulk (insulation), so probably one with a windstopper barrier. For an aider, look into the Metolius Alpine Aider, , seems to be a good start. 
Check out these two great links, first one from an old Alpinist article, the other a TR on a winter ascent of D7. 

[urlhttp://www.wwwright.com/climbing/tripreports/2007/WinterDiamond.htm]http://www.alpinist.com/doc/ALP19/mountain-profile-longs-diamond/url]
[urlhttp://www.wwwright.com/climbing/tripreports/2007/WinterDiamond.htm

Hope you get up there and bring back some treasured memories.
One of my hero's Mugs Stump made a winter solo of D7 in 1979.  Badass.
Alex