Author Topic: Humping Loads - on your shoulders  (Read 1078 times)

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Offline mungeclimber

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Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« on: February 23, 2014, 10:59:24 pm »
Fellow load humpers. My shoulder muscles took a beating with a light duty load today (drill, kit, rope, rack, harness, helmet, 3 beers, small Gatorade, small water bottle and food. It's an Arc Teryx pack with padded shoulders, and a decent waist belt. Forgot the name. I want to say 40 liters. It's not a full backpacking size.

So two theories - 1) not enough hydration, 2) my load stabilizers aren't really coming off my shoulders at a 45 degree angle. More like 5 degrees up.

thoughts?

Alternatively, more ibuprofen?


Offline rocky IV

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2014, 09:43:34 am »
sounds like all the weight is on your shoulders, adjust it so the hip belt holds more of the weight. Or just suck it up, buttercup.

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #2 on: February 24, 2014, 11:02:26 am »
i have no ass to speak of, so keeping a heavy bag from sliding down my backside (and thereby loading the shoulders) is a pretty common occurrence.

copy that on the grin and bear it.


wondering though, how many folks have some sort of stickier material on the hipbelt to prevent sliding down?


Offline *Mucci*

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2014, 11:21:57 am »
Start humping real loads.

This ain't no weenie roast!

Lite duty Mayo bro!

:)

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2014, 11:27:37 am »
for sure, already copped to it.


but how is a heavier load going to help if I'm already sliding the rig down.


I know, take it to a backpacking forum....

Offline Skully

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2014, 07:48:11 pm »
Cinch it up more? Glute workouts? I dunno. I try to keep the weight lower myself. My shoulders can't really take much of a pounding anymore.

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2014, 07:38:16 pm »
cinching up sux, reducing o2 intake for sure.

I did use my light small harness so I could carry more hangers and bolts, and ONLY took 3 beers. :)

Offline rocky IV

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2014, 09:37:24 pm »
I have a pretty flat butt as well. I just cinch the waistbelt up. It rides just below my hips, so minimal/no squeezing on my diaphragm. When I have to hump loads I try and do it in as few as possible, probably has to do with being strong like bull, smart like tractor. Anyway, load hauling sucks, but as long as the bag is adjusted well it shouldn't be overly painful. Go forth and send.

Offline cobbledik

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2014, 09:26:47 am »
Just remember approaching zodiac, then all will feel better in comparison. At least now you have a working waistbelt.
Sometimes the difference between a layman and a journeyman is simply what he is allowed to believe himself to be.

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2014, 11:55:39 am »


roger that

Offline Skully

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #10 on: February 26, 2014, 12:46:30 pm »
So where were you headed?

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2014, 01:31:41 pm »
another mile or so past this...



which for the life of me, I'm not sure why. lol

Offline Raaf

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2014, 05:05:08 pm »
After daydreaming a little about how much I'd rather be humping a load of gear to any cliff base than sitting at my desk. . . . . I refocused on your original question.

Man--- a mid-sized gear pack is very unlikely to transfer weight on to your hips very efficiently. Even if you were a regular backpacker, your shoulders would get worked from a light load going any distance when the frame isn't doing the right thing.

You need a full sized legit pack, preferably a well-fitted internal frame rig. It doesn't have to be full when you use it. It's just that the frame is made to bear the weight on your hips. Even for us guys with pretty straight body shapes.

Good deals can be found. Last year while perusing the local Goodwill, I found a nearly new Mountainsmith pack for something like $15. (Didn't need it, but I bought it and gave it to a buddy.)

I usually do the first haul of wall gear with a Lowe Special Expedition, an internal frame pack I bought back in 1985. Still works great. And if I have to stash it at some base, I don't worry about it getting trashed. It's had a good life.

Edit: If I was taking a moderately (or heavily) loaded haul bag any further than the base of El Cap or the Column, I'd definitely consider strapping it to a frame pack rather than using the haul bag suspension.
 
« Last Edit: February 26, 2014, 05:18:04 pm by Raaf »

Offline Gagner

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2014, 09:07:15 pm »
As someone that formerly worked for a backpack company, the load lifters need to be at 45 degrees, but the real key is having a structured - stiff - waist belt.  What happens with heavy loads is that the waist belt gets pushed down in back, and up in front - so the load drops on to your shoulders.  I have a custom-ish Denali pack from Gregory that has a wicked stiff waist belt.  I use this for humping loads approaching 80-100 pounds and it works better than any other pack I've ever worn.  In fact, even though the pack itself is a bit heavier, I prefer the support for any loads over 30-ish pounds.  Lastly, make sure the torso length and stays on the pack are the right length for you.  This has nothing to do with your height.  My wife is 5' 9" and wears a large frame size, while I'm 6' 1" and wear a medium.  My height is in my long legs, so my torso is shorter.

Oh, and stay hydrated - drink more beer.....

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #14 on: February 26, 2014, 11:05:58 pm »
Quote
In fact, even though the pack itself is a bit heavier, I prefer the support for any loads over 30-ish pounds.


BINGO!

Thx Paul. Was hoping you'd dial this conversation in.

I know the basics of backpack fitting, but getting that balance for a mid weight load in a durable crag pack is where I think I'm pushing the boundaries of a crag pack. I'm pretty sure my load was just over 30. 9.4mm x 60m cord, 5lb drill, 10 bolts and hangers, and 1 set of anchor rings, hammer, beer, water, light rack, food ... you get the idea.

For a hike that was 7 miles total, with under 1000' of gain, and that kind of load, I think the stats are against an average human. Sure we can all suffer, but why? As a result, for a shorter mileage hike, with less gain, I don't have trouble with this pack. There's probably a X, Y and Z graph that could show the tradeoffs of mileage to weight to type of pack.

Ok, so now the question is: which pack? I'm partial to Arc Teryx. But they are pricey and I no longer have a pro deal for them. And, I should mention I've tried the big arc teryx packs, but the waist belt tore me up worse than a haul bag.

more later...

Offline cobbledik

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Re: Humping Loads - on your shoulders
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2014, 01:21:06 pm »
I use the mountain hardwear bmg for massive loads. Makes 100lbs feel like 60lbs (which still sucks)

But I don't do long approaches so I never use it. Usually, if it's a long approach (or descent) I find the best technical solution is to find another climb.
Sometimes the difference between a layman and a journeyman is simply what he is allowed to believe himself to be.