Author Topic: wall Shoes  (Read 38417 times)

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Offline the_dude

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« on: February 09, 2006, 09:24:43 pm »
I've been using Five Ten guide tennies for a while. They free climb the best out of any approach shoes I've used so far. The only problem is my arches get sore after standing in slings all day. I was thinking of trying a new shoe. What are you all using? any recommendations?

Offline mungeclimber

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« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2006, 01:14:06 pm »
Boreal Big Wall boot is what I have circa 1990ish.

good for standing in slings all day, pretty decent free climbing, but not as good as the guide tennie cinched down oddly enough. The guide tennie is more sensitive.

Offline freakshow

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« Reply #2 on: February 12, 2006, 11:33:03 am »
I use jogging shoes and they are pure torture.....sore to stand in all day, toes get munched, and they're terrible for free climbing.  If I have to do some free climbing I'll keep my rock shoes on my harness until I need them.  Can't afford to buy more gear for a while so big wall shoes will have to wait.

Offline needlz

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« Reply #3 on: March 06, 2006, 06:29:08 pm »
I've been thinking of getting a pair of the Five Tennies, but I've seen some reviews saying the rubber sole peals off fairly early in their life.  I've had this problem with several pairs of Five-Ten climbing shoes over time.  I think it has something to do with the Stealth rubber.  It doesn't seem to hold glue as well as other rubbers.  Are the shoes worth it for a cheap aid / approach shoe?

Offline the_dude

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« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2006, 04:53:48 pm »
That's kinda the problem with Five-Ten... Five or Ten pitches max. Actually My guide tennies have held up better than I thought they would. It seems like all shoes blow out with the abuse wall climbing gives them. I was just looking at Five-Tens new Insight model, might give them a spin. They look like their a bit beefier than the guide tennie.

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: wall shoes
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2006, 11:37:53 pm »
Quote from: needlz
I've been thinking of getting a pair of the Five Tennies, but I've seen some reviews saying the rubber sole peals off fairly early in their life.  I've had this problem with several pairs of Five-Ten climbing shoes over time.  I think it has something to do with the Stealth rubber.  It doesn't seem to hold glue as well as other rubbers.  Are the shoes worth it for a cheap aid / approach shoe?


I haven't had any problem with mine over the last half year delaminating, until I was in death valley around a camp fire and smelled the rubber burning. heat will delam. So now I trip over my toes with that flap of rubber. gotta get some shoe go or something.  anyone got a c-clamp?

Offline syrinx

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« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2006, 11:42:03 am »
I use a cheep ass pair of hiking boots from the local discount store. I  look mainly for comfort and a hard  soul to match my hard sole.  I then paint all the stiching and the tow area with tool-dip for added durability. Generally they suck for free climbing and will only last two walls but  it's cheap!

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Offline spyork

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Big wall boots
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2006, 12:13:11 pm »
I was gonna use a pair of montrail hiking boots I have. They will prolly suck for free climbing though. They are comfortable and have a rigid sole though. They were the only size 12.5 boots I could find at the time. My big feet are a PITA to get fitted for.

Steve

Offline zetedog

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« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2006, 07:53:18 pm »
Didn't intend them to be aid shoes,  but I bought a pair of the montrail CTC last year for long day hikes with scrambles.

The toe box is slightly narrow, but has a full rand, edges decently well, and provides adequate support in aiders.

Of course, east coast walls are much shorter, so don't konw how'd they feel on day two. but they were better than the asics that I had been using.

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Offline fareastclimber

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« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2006, 06:15:19 am »
I use a pair of Garmont Sticky Twists that I am please with. Stiff sole and rigid toe and a design where the arch of your foot doesn't seem to stick out of the sides, minimising any aider foot pain.

Offline lunchbox

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« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2006, 02:01:16 pm »
i'm on my 2nd pair of La Sport's Exem Ridge.  it's a trail running shoe that's a little bit like a hiking boot with really sticky rubber.  it has a stiff mid sole in the arch and feels great in aiders.  they free climb really well too, once you wear off  the sticky dots on the bottom.

i used a pair of guide tennies for a couple of walls but the arch and toes box broken down pretty fast.

Offline MontyB

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insoles
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2006, 08:03:56 pm »
has anyone experimented with a stiff insole like superfeet for wall shoes?  I've got a pair of guide tennies I like, but the are a bit floppy for any extended use in aiders.  Plus I think a little extra stiffness might not hurt on the free climbing side too.  Any opinions/experiences with this?

Offline Baltoro

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« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2006, 01:30:46 pm »
I've got a pair of guide tennies that have held up really well so far. I wear them at work basically every day during the week and I'm in a warehouse and they see a fair amount of abuse. Only have a few aid and free pitches on them but they climb quite well. One thing to note is that 5.10 updated the tennie with some sort of stiffening plastic thing under the arch, making them much nicer to stand in aiders than previous models. I don't know if those of you who've used them had this or not.
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Offline euroford

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« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2006, 08:30:26 pm »
i picked up a pair of montrail d7's a couple of weeks ago.  i have a couple of pitches on them so far; they came highly recomended and are exceesing expectations.  comfy walking, comfy in aiders, randing looks tough, sticky rubber, excellent scrambling and i'd feel pretty confident on low 5th free climbing.

Offline syrinx

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« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2006, 11:58:35 pm »
On my recent leaning tower trip I used a pair of Sportiva Makalu's. They worked great for the little climbing that actually got done. I could not feel the aiders cuttingo my feet at all.

Syrinx
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Offline mungeclimber

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« Reply #15 on: April 23, 2006, 11:19:45 pm »
Quote from: mungeclimber
Boreal Big Wall boot is what I have circa 1990ish.

good for standing in slings all day, pretty decent free climbing, but not as good as the guide tennie cinched down oddly enough. The guide tennie is more sensitive.


correction, they are getting more sensitive now that I used them again.
I think I'm going to run a bead of seam grip on them to prevent excess wear and tear between the sole and upper.

Offline syrinx

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« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2006, 08:44:25 am »
Good idea using seam grip. I cove the entire toe of my boot with tool-dip (plasti-dip), smae thing I use for the ledge and bag as well.

Syrinx
Never approach a bull from the front, a horse from the rear, or a fool from any direction!

Offline needlz

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La Sprtiva B5's
« Reply #17 on: June 30, 2006, 01:41:47 pm »
I recently acquired a pair of La Sprtiva B5's.  I've done some climbing up to 5.9 in em and they seem like they'll be great.  Aiders don't cut into my arches at all.  They are an approach shoe with a climbing edge on the toe box and a rounded rubber toebox and heel. They are way more comfortable than my hiking boots and scramble over talus much better.  I'm about to head up Salathe Wall this week and I'll post back on how they hold up.

cheers,
j

Offline blackrider

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« Reply #18 on: July 04, 2006, 02:14:36 am »
Just picked up some La Sportiva Guide shoes . Have to still give them a ran around the block before I can weigh in on how good they are as a wall shoe. I"ll weigh in after that.
'

Offline mungeclimber

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Re: La Sprtiva B5's
« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2006, 10:13:28 am »
Quote from: needlz
I recently acquired a pair of La Sprtiva B5's.  I've done some climbing up to 5.9 in em and they seem like they'll be great.  Aiders don't cut into my arches at all.  They are an approach shoe with a climbing edge on the toe box and a rounded rubber toebox and heel. They are way more comfortable than my hiking boots and scramble over talus much better.  I'm about to head up Salathe Wall this week and I'll post back on how they hold up.

cheers,
j


more power to ya

btw, I saw these at Larry's site...

http://www.mountaintools.com/cat/rclimb/rshoes/BorealBigwallClimbingShoe.htm


Offline routehogger

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« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2006, 10:37:49 am »
I'v used North Face Builderings. Moderately stiff, but the Vibram shoe is starting to peel badly. TB honest, I'v worn 'em for pretty much 24/7 the past 6 months so aiding alone is not to blame...

I'v been thinking getting Kayland Vertigos which would double nicely as a hiking boot

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Offline the_dude

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« Reply #21 on: August 29, 2006, 02:50:58 pm »
I tried out a pair of mad Rock Fanatics  on WC. Maybe a got them a bit to small, but the stiff rubber over the toes caused a pressure point when standing in aiders. The arch had enough support though. The rubber didn't feel that secure on the rock untill it scuffed up a bit. So far, not completely sold on em. I just picked up a pair of La Sportiva Cirque Pros. The look like a beefed up version of the guide tennie but with a bit more rand. I'm gonna give em a try on EC in a few weeks and I'll post my results.
Cheers

Offline mungeclimber

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« Reply #22 on: August 29, 2006, 04:51:22 pm »
thx the_dude

hope to hear the story of how they fare.



I got a pair too. REI they are on sale for like 20% off.

Offline Craig Peer

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« Reply #23 on: August 29, 2006, 06:01:38 pm »
I'd like to know how they do too. Wall shoes have been a problem for quite a while!!

Offline euroford

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« Reply #24 on: August 29, 2006, 08:22:43 pm »
i thought i would update re: my montrail d7's after using them on the diamond.

as far as the aid climbing and scrambling went, i just couldn't be happier.  they were comfortable and performed extremely well.  they also show little or no damage other than some treadwear.  the sticky rubber was awsome for sketchy scrambling with a pig on my back.

one problem though.  the narow toebox is great for climbing and makes stepping up in aiders easy, but the descent with a huge pig -killed- my big toes.  big time.  its a month later, and my left toenail is falling off.  every step was excrusiating as my toes were pounded into the front of the shoe.  

so, grade a+ for wall climbing, grade b+ for scrambling, grade f for long descents with huge loads.

Offline the_dude

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« Reply #25 on: August 29, 2006, 08:24:40 pm »
Quote from: mungeclimber
I got a pair too. REI they are on sale for like 20% off.

Yup, thats exactly where I got mine.

Offline mungeclimber

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« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2006, 10:23:23 pm »
euroford, i ended up doing two sizes of my Guide Tennies. One pair that I mistakenly bought too big. I use that pair for the longer scrambles that have heinous down.  Very sloppy on the climbing though. Trade offs, ya know.

Offline euroford

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« Reply #27 on: August 31, 2006, 08:06:15 am »
i of course had also thought about packing along a pair of shoes more suitable to the hiking, but decided against it for weight and bulk reasons.  obviously, in retrospect i realize the extra 1 pound would have been entirly inconsiquential and vastly more endurable than the viscous toe pounding.

i had also thought the montrails would be 'good enough'.  for the record, 'good enough' is NOT good enough for hiking pigs to and from the diamond!  such endevours require 'the best'.

i guess its all about balance, you can't have 'the best' wall shoe also be 'the best' hiker.  i really do belive the Montrail D7 is the best aid climbing shoe your money can buy; new, at your favorite gear store, without needing any customization.  its also a dang good scrambler, and a decent free climber (i've only climbed it up to 5.7, of course i don't often free climb harder than 5.7 in the first place....), but only a passable hiker.  i'll still wear it out to my local crag, but anything more than a couple of miles i'm going to be wearing.....

my merrells.  i've had the best luck with the merrell chameleon line.  for some reason they have always taken a week or so to break in, but when they do they are the most comfortable, lightweight trail eating hiking shoe i've ever had.  i'm on pair four, i get about 1 year of near daily use per pair.  they have proven to be adiquate free climbers, good scramblers, good aid climbers and supurb hikers.

Offline caribouman

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« Reply #28 on: September 07, 2006, 01:07:45 pm »
A wall boot suggestion for those of you who might have some old PA's or Canyons in the closet:  When the soles of my Canyons were nearly worn out, I belt-sanded the soles to give them more shape. (2.5mm at the heel, 1mm under the arch, 4mm under the ball down to near zero at the tip of the toe)  Then I took them to a shoe repair shop with my C4 resole kit in hand, and they did the rest.  The result is great for standing in etriers, getting my feet in and out of them, edging on dimes (if I can find 'em), and wide cracks.  The drawback is that they cannot work as an approach shoe:  the lack of tread that makes for smooth aid footwork is too sketchy on grit-covered approaches.  Anyway, it might be a relatively cheap solution to an old problem.
                               Cheers, Caribouman
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Offline Feral Rat

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« Reply #29 on: September 20, 2006, 09:24:38 pm »
the guide tennies seem to work for me.  They are only good for about 2 el cap routes bofore a resole is needed.  An insole makes them better as well as a good pair of socks.  I do not like big heavy boots as it makes it harder for me to use my feet.  Sometime I just were a comfortable pair of climbing shoes with good socks.
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