Author Topic: The Big Wall Mindset  (Read 3694 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
The Big Wall Mindset
« on: May 13, 2008, 11:15:15 pm »
This is so true...


A determined and positive attitude is required for a successful big-wall ascent; dispassionate or negative attitudes guarantee failure.  Big-wall climbing seems to require three basic mental talents: 1)  Concentration and awareness: the ability to "keep it together" for long periods of time, combined with forethought and a fine-tuned awareness of the environment (gear, rock, weather, partner, etc.); 2)  Commitment: commitment towards achieving a goal, and a willingness to repeatedly make an effort, and deal with hardships positively; and 3)  Communication: working effectively and efficiently with partners.  The mental aspect of big-wall climbing can be just as challenging as the physical aspect.


http://www.bigwalls.net/climb/BigWallTechManual.htm

Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2008, 11:20:23 pm »
and not get bogged down by this...


Offline jake

  • A2 Flyer
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2008, 11:01:06 am »
The number 1 should be the ability to not think, what if? what if? what if? Sure you may nail that ledge, but the odds are really against that.  How many aiders have died?   
Also life on the ground is great but there is enough of it... why not spend a couple weeks a year up there.


Offline Garbonzo

  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 358
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2008, 02:02:12 pm »
Plan to suffer.

Welcome the suffering.

Enjoy the suffering.

Miss the suffering when it's over.

Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2008, 02:45:05 pm »
Buddhist term for suffering... dukha or something similar.


http://www.gurbani.org/webart61.htm


not that I'm religious at all, just getting into the logical understanding of welcoming suffering. 


ungawaw!


Offline offset

  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 235
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2008, 03:12:28 pm »
laugh when your aider clips your last piece of gear when going free!





Offline Baltoro

  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 154
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2008, 03:14:04 pm »
This more than almost any other thread on here is probably most relevant to succeeding on a wall.

I did a lot of my practice aiding while solo. I just couldn't connect with any regular partners. Then when a partner couldn't make it on a trip I contemplated going solo. I went out for a practice day with the mindset of me soloing a wall and it was completely different. Like Jake said, the what-ifs really get to you. I'd done the majority of my pitches solo and all the sudden every pitch wiped me out, even though they were pitches I'd soloed many times before. Weird.

Suffering...

I think reading stories of others suffering more is helpful. Minus 148, Annapurna, any early bigwall tales, pretty much anything by Twight, Shackleton. That sort of stuff seems to make aiding by choice seem not that bad in the grand scheme of things.

Better (or worse I guess) yet would be to read stories about people suffering not by choice. Realizing struggle is a way of life for so many in the world and that here we are, able to recreate and suffer for fun, sort of...

As for laughing when the aiders catch while going free, that's what partners are for.

Sometimes I succeed. Sometimes I fail. Sometimes I am too lazy to do either.
M. Twight

Offline mungeclimber

  • Administrator
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2257
    • View Profile
    • http://www.sonorapassclimbing.com
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2008, 04:17:52 pm »
good insight offset


too true baltoro

Offline lambone

  • WebDJ
  • A4+ Dreamer
  • *****
  • Posts: 571
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2008, 09:57:17 pm »
great thread

you gotta want it bad, to the point wher you think, dream, eat, and shit wall climbing. and when you get there you just make it happen and enjoy the ride.

suffering is a means to the end, part of the process and part of the delight.

from the get go think of only two reasons for failure, injury, or weather. anything other reason is just your incapacity to accept the suffering, and your inability to enjoy all aspects of the wall life.

good luck on your next adventure fellas.

Offline lunchbox

  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 221
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2008, 12:37:05 am »
1st time wall rats remember,

It will take forever to complete your climb if you don't climb placement by placement.

Climbing a pitch in 15 minutes is not a likely reality. 

A four pitch per day pace is not slow!

You can't possibly expect to feel the same way after your summited you first wall. 

The climbing isn't over when you bivi....you'll have to do it all over again in the morning. 

It can only get easier from here.   
« Last Edit: May 15, 2008, 11:11:48 am by lunchbox »

Offline Rags

  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 177
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2008, 10:50:36 am »
Let's not overlook the existential aspects of Wall climbing. Existentialism generally postulates that the absence of a transcendent force (God) means that the individual is

entirely free, and, therefore, ultimately responsible. Existentialism tends to focus on the question of human existence ? the feeling that there is no purpose, indeed nothing, 

at the core of existence. The way to counter this "nothing" is the embrace of existence, the here and now.The big-wall climber, as much or more than others, embraces

this central idea of existentialism. The "wall climb" is an absolute embrace of existence. My friend John was often heard saying,"we're not on the couch living lives of quiet desperation".

Indeed, the point he made was we embraced our life and living through climbing. No where is that more true than on a wall. Dan Osman approached life in a very similar way. I read some quote from him years ago tha suggested he found life through the confrontation with fear and death. He took it to the extreme.

Beyond that, it was Victor Frankl that suggested man has innate capacity to find meaning in an otherwise meaningless world. For me, I find my meaning, and much of my identity, in climbing.

Being on a wall is the escape to reality, and thus, the embrace of existence.



Or as a great wall philosopher once posited, "Dood, that OE in the creek is gonna be soo dakine."
« Last Edit: May 16, 2008, 10:52:07 am by Rags »
Be Safe, Live Long, Climb Hard!

Rick

Offline jake

  • A2 Flyer
  • ***
  • Posts: 59
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2008, 10:19:49 pm »
I went climbing again recently and remembered that the number 1 thing is having fun!!!  Even when it was pouring rain, I was still having fun.  The OE was drank while ascending the creek. 

Offline alpinist63

  • Gumby
  • *
  • Posts: 20
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #12 on: May 18, 2008, 12:57:03 pm »
some good points to succeed on a bigwall, very imprtant for me, are:
think pitch by pitch ( 20 or 30 pitches are a lot, so better cut the thing in digestable pieces...)
be aware that the first day is by far the hardest as the ground is still close, the bags still heavy, and the temptation to bail is omnipresent.
when considering bailing: think about what Lance Armstrong says about suffering through a hard race: when you bail because you are uncomfortable, tired.... you will regret that for the rest of your life(or at least till you get back on that route and that can be a long time), on the other hand if you go on and try harder, you'll have the satisfaction for the rest of your life.

so, up the wall everybody out there! have fun ( also a very important point for succeeding!!!) 

Offline hammock-soloer

  • A3 Fool
  • ****
  • Posts: 107
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #13 on: May 20, 2008, 12:11:14 am »
I'm like dude is up there If we catch up to him we can get a bud.

skully

  • Guest
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #14 on: May 03, 2009, 03:02:14 pm »
Having bailed a few times, the reasons we did so were, in retrospect , paltry & feeble.
We were weak. After having suceeded a few times since, there is no better feeling.

Just hangin' in there, Boss.
Buds are better on a high ledge, HS.
It's ALL better. And nothing else matters.

Offline goatboy

  • A1 fiend
  • **
  • Posts: 42
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #15 on: May 03, 2009, 06:13:49 pm »
Slowly I turn step by step inch by inch till we're on top.

Good food & brew helps as well.

Offline KevinW

  • A3+ Copper Bender
  • *****
  • Posts: 174
    • View Profile
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #16 on: May 03, 2009, 09:14:53 pm »
Good food & brew helps as well.

Couldn't agree more goatboy, leave the granola bars and power gels for the alpine, on a wall you need to eat,
and having good food to look forward to goes a long way to keeping the spirits up!
(A few brews never hurt either)

skully

  • Guest
Re: The Big Wall Mindset
« Reply #17 on: May 04, 2009, 01:32:40 pm »
Hey, Munge.....Looks like a pic of France.
Yowza! Haha.